Tag Archives: Christian literature

Jesus is God coming to us in love. Sheer unadulterated, unfiltered love. Stripped of everything that could get in the way. Naked and vulnerable, hanging on a cross, asking the question, “What will you do with me?”

Rob Bell, Sex|God: Exploring The Endless Connections Between Sexuality and Spirituality

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The Shack: A Book Review

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Written by WM. Paul Young, The Shack tells the story of Mack and his encounter with God four years after the death of his beloved daughter, Missy, in an abandoned shack where the remains of her dress was found. It is a fiction with a hint of theology.

I’ve had this book for a long time but it was only now that I read it. At first, I read it out of boredom, and much to my dismay, the book was boring, too. The writing style did not impress me so I thought of dropping the read. But, since I’ve been craving for anything in print, I decided to finish reading it. As I progressed into the story, I found myself unable to put this book down. Over the course of my reading, things started to get interesting. I had to say, I somehow identified with Mack and The Great Sadness because I read at the time of family turmoil and lapsed in and out of sadness, too (I wouldn’t even call it depression, not even in the mildest sense). What caught me so much was the theology. A word of caution to new believers, though. Some of the doctrinal issues presented were so wrong I had to disagree even if they were presented ever so attractively. There were good points, however, and one would have to sift through thoroughly to discern what goes and stays in the mind. Plot-wise, it was good enough to catch my attention. I question the possibility of Mack’s encounter with God, nonetheless.

We have to be careful with whatever we entertain and with what we choose our minds to dwell on. The mind is the fortress and the battle for its control is never- ending. Constantly, we have to filter whatever goes into our minds. We have to measure every thought against the Word of God, and if those thoughts fail to meet God’s truth, then no doubt those thoughts have no place in our minds.

Scholars believe that the word sex is related to the Latin word secare, which means “to sever, to amputate, or to disconnect from the whole”.

Our sexuality, then, has two dimensions. First, our sexuality is our awareness of how profoundly we’re severed and cut off and disconnected. Second, our sexuality is all of the ways we go about trying to reconnect.

Rob Bell, Sex|God: Exploring The Endless Connections Between Sexuality and Spirituality